Athena Pierquet

Posted on 2016/10/29 by

Pirates in the Classroom: The Afterlives of a Lecture Recording

Information piracy, whether in popular culture or in academia, is largely an issue of circulation. Unlike its swash-buckling and sea-faring counterpart, the OED describes this form of piracy as “the unauthorized reproduction or use of an invention or work of another, as a book, recording, computer software, intellectual property, etc., esp. as constituting an infringement of Read More

Posted on 2016/10/13 by

Other People’s Preserves: The Citation Economies of a Canning Blog

Unlike most methods of preparing and cooking food, preserving — the practice of canning, pickling, fermenting and drying food — allows for the long-term storage seasonal produce. This temporal dimension specific to preserving has its roots in “historical” practice: these processing methods pre-date the widespread availability of refrigeration technologies, agro-industrial supply chains, and the perpetual Read More

Posted on 2016/09/25 by

France’s ReLIRE Project: How to Reconcile Mass Digitization & the ‘Droit d’Auteur’

In 2011, the ruling in a U.S. court case, Authors Guild, Inc. v. HathiTrust, set a precedent in copyright law by protecting the digital archives produced by libraries for preservation purposes under fair dealing. While the European Copyright Directive allows for the mass digitization of orphan works for non-commercial purposes, in Canadian copyright law the Read More

Posted on 2015/12/15 by

A Look Inside: The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries Digital Humanities Lab

In my search for people who work/study/use or interact with physical spaces in the Humanities as part of the “What is a Media Lab?” project, I had the opportunity to speak to Ann Hanlon of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries Digital Humanities Lab. The DH Lab was an intiative launched in the Fall of 2013 Read More

Posted on 2015/11/25 by

Environmental Humanities: Engaging Critics in an Interdisciplinary Space

Studies of the environment have a history of being characterized by a deep division between scientific research and humanities scholarship. In the same way, literary ecocriticism has been engrained within a critical lineage associated with an American wilderness ethic and Jeffersonian logic of “culture” in opposition to “the environment.” In conversation with anti-making discourses, that Read More