Probes

Posted on 2017/11/30 by

The Rhizomic (Memory) Collection: A Non-Linear Approach to the Preservation of Video games, Game consoles, and their data.

The seminar “The Research Collection” has, in a way, encouraged me to reflect on my book and music collecting habits. To assess memories, I have preserved in the corners of my mind. To assess the value and relevance I place upon them. For the first time, I considered myself a collector of memories, not only Read More

Posted on 2017/11/24 by

The Archive(d) Game: Notes on the Preservation, Nostalgia, and Embodied Experience of the Game Boy Advance

In my last probe, I argued that a meaningful study of a video game platform as both an artifact and a cultural object demands that its emulators be taken into account. The isolation of hardware or software from its afterlives renders invisible the relationships between media platforms, the bodies of their impossible, ideal users, and Read More

Posted on 2017/11/22 by

The leaky life & times of the AA battery inside the Residual Media Depot: A snapshot of battery life & faded battery power

The area of concern I am focused on is e-waste and specifically, dead batteries. What do dead batteries have to do with degradation and loss of materials within a literary archive, within a museum collection, or in this case, within the Residual Media Depot (RMD)? Before I answer that question, I will orient you the Read More

Posted on 2017/11/05 by

Embodiment, Emulation, and Nostalgic Experience: The (After)Lives of the Game Boy Advance

In November 2006 and then in April 2013, Nintendo launched the Virtual Console for the Wii and WiiU respectively, a dedicated section of the Wii Shop Channel and Nintendo eShop that, according to their website, allows players to “experience some of the top titles from the NES, Super NES and Game Boy Advance eras.” The Read More

Posted on 2017/10/18 by

“World’s Greatest Dad”: The Ideological Work of the Richler Room Ephemera

In “Teaching Collections Management Anthropologically,” Cara Krmpotich details the iterative, multi-stage creation of a teaching collection for use by her Collections Management class at the University of Toronto. After briefly outlining the pedagogical importance of students’ embodied interactions with objects of material culture, Krmpotich discusses her initial challenge of not having a dedicated collection associated Read More

Posted on 2017/10/10 by

Box Anxiety: Collections and the Things that Contain Them/Us

Elizabeth Yakel states that “[a]rchivists are in the container business” (140), a claim I find highly relevant to the Residual Media Depot (RMD) and the Mordecai Richler Reading Room, two Concordia research collections [1] that contain a significant number of items in boxes. Yakel classifies archival boxes as “physical” containers, contrasting them with “intellectual” containers such as Read More

Posted on 2017/10/10 by

Collect Them All (Again): Ownership, Obsession, and Monetization in Mobile Gacha Games

Last February, Nintendo and Intelligent Systems released the first title in the twenty-seven-year-old Fire Emblem franchise specifically designed for mobile gameplay, and the only installment to operate on a platform other than a Nintendo console—emulation notwithstanding. As a strategy role playing game imbued with gambling elements, Fire Emblem Heroes conforms to an increasingly prevalent free-to-play Read More

Posted on 2016/11/15 by

The Controller is Mightier than the Pen: How Video Games Blur the Lines of Authorship

There’s an argument to be made that the video game, as a medium, is inherently post-modern. If that, as a statement, is too general or perhaps diminutive, then it’s perhaps safer to say that the medium reflects certain key characteristics of post-modernism as it appears in art: there’s a tendency towards self-reflexivity, an arguably necessary Read More

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